Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Fuller Theological Seminary’

ISAAC Nor Cal Update (May 5, 2011)

May 5, 2011

Dear friends of ISAAC Nor Cal!

Happy Easter and Cinco de Mayo! I pray that you are experiencing the joy of the Lord regardless of your circumstances! ISAAC is celebrating its fifth anniversary this year, so we are eager to share with you what we’ve been doing since we started. We also want to unveil our hopes and aspirations for the next five years. So keep looking out for future updates. There are several important events and activities in this update. If you cannot participate, please invite your friends! – Tim Tseng

* * *

1. Asian American Christianity: A Four Week Study (Sponsored by The Harvest Group’s Perspectives in World Christianity)
ISAAC is proud to offer this mini-course designed to help participants better understand and minister to Asian Americans!
Dates: Sundays, June 5, 12, 19 and 26 from 4-7pm.
Location: Community Baptist Church, 2215 Curtner Ave., Campbell, CA 95008.
Cost for the course is $88 (cash and checks only, register at the door).
To register on line go to:
http://www.theharvestgroupforgod.org/harvestGroup/classes.html [updated 5/17/11]

2. INTRODUCING….ISAAC Arts and Lectures?! (Not to be confused with City Arts and Lectures)

ISAAC Nor Cal will offer occasional talks and lectures on a variety of topics in the upcoming year. These talks will stimulate deeper reflection for Christian faith in Asian American contexts, but will not be so academic that only a specialized audience can participate. We call it our ISAAC scholar program!

First up is Dr. Amos Yong: Asian American Evangelical Theology: Its Legacy and Mandate
Thursday, June 16, 2011 • 7:30-9:30 PM
Location: Canaan Taiwanese Christian Church
4405 Fortran Drive, San Jose, CA 95134
To register, go to: http://conta.cc/jKCn45

Summary: The task of Asian American evangelical theology remains to be undertaken. This lecture explores the internal logic of North American evangelicalism, which minimizes the impetus toward theological thinking among Asian Americans, and suggests how Asian American evangelicals can remind their evangelical colleagues about the necessity of engaging contextual reflection for the revitalization of the evangelical theological enterprise as a whole. A shortened version of this talk was given at ISAAC’s Asian American Equipping Symposium at Fuller in February 2011. It can be viewed here: http://vimeo.com/20826365 (21:59).

About the speaker: Amos Yong is the J. Rodman Williams Professor of Theology and Director of Doctor of Philosophy Program at Regent University in Virginia. His research interests are in Global Pentecostalism, Theology of disability, Theology and Science, Political Theology, Inter-faith Dialogue, and in Asian American Theology. His books include Hospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices, and the Neighbor (Orbis, 2008), Theology and Down Syndrome: Reimagining Disability in Late Modernity (Baylor, 2007) and The Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh: Pentecostalism and the Possibility of Global Theology (Baker, 2005). Prior to academia, Yong was a pastor in various churches in California, Washington and Massachusetts, the son of a pastor and missionary raised in Stockton. He is married to Alma and has three children. For more information about Amos click this link. He will be Canaan Taiwanese Christian Church’s English ministry retreat speaker on June 17-19.

3. Good news! The Doctor of Missiology cohort in the area of Asian North American leadership (through Fuller Theological Seminary’s School of Intercultural Studies) has been “green lighted” and is now accepting applicants for Fall 2011. Here is an opportunity to work with ISAAC scholars Young Lee Hertig, Tim Tseng, and others. Go to http://wp.me/p7DTu-i0 for more information.

4. Thank you for a great Beyond Tiger Mom event with Helen Lee!
More than 120 participants joined us at Grace Alliance Church (Milipitas) on March 19 to reflect on how parents can help their children develop missional values. Thanks to you, we also collected $455 for Japan Disaster relief via World Vision. To engage this topic further, go to http://themissionalmom.com/.

5. In the works….

(a) Nor Cal Asian American Pastors’ retreat to discuss practical theological issues related to Asian American contexts and to network and have fun!
(b) Forthcoming books: Worship on the Way by Russell Yee (a case for Asian American worship) and Asian American Young Adults Primer (title tentative), edited by Jennifer Ikoma-Motzko and Timothy Tseng (based on Five Cries of Asian American Young Adults and other authors).

* * *

Whew! I’m glad you read this far. To reward you, here is a nice devotional reflection from E. Stanley Jones, mid-twentieth missionary to India and advocate for peace and justice…

Joy is a mark of maturity. The sad, morose type of person is immature. For that unhappiness is being caused, almost entirely, through inner conflicts and wrong attitudes toward life. When we get rid of inner conflicts and wrong attitudes toward life, we will almost automatically burst into joy. For we are made for joy – made for it in the inner structure of our beings. And when we are truly ourselves by being truly His, then we are joyous, constitutionally. Rendell Harris says: “Joy is the strength of the people of God; it is their chief characteristic.” Where there is no joy there is no Christianity, and where there is no Christianity, there is no joy. “So there was much joy in that city,” was said of the Samaritan city, because “Philip…proclaimed to them the Christ.” Christ and joy go together. Where He is, there is joy, and where He is not, there is sadness. “And he went away sadly” – everybody goes away from Christ sadly. For when you go away from Christ you go away from joy. He is joy – a fountain of joy. The Christian way is piety set to music. It is fun!

O Jesus, to know Thee is to know joy. And it is joy that is not spasmodic, but continuous. For as long as Thou art within, joy is within, and any little thing sets if off. I am joyous in the thought of Thy joy. Amen.

— E. Stanley Jones, Christian Maturity (Abingdon, 1957)

Advertisements

Videos of ISAAC Equipping Symposium at Fuller now available!

February 28, 2011 Leave a comment

Greetings friends!

We’ve posted most of the videos of ISAAC So Cal-Fuller’s Equipping Symposium on our vimeo account. More will be posted! Have a look: http://vimeo.com/isaacvid/videos

Also, photos can be found at ISAAC’s facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ISAAC/18289178852

– Tim Tseng and Young Lee Hertig

Reflections on the Symposium at Fuller

February 21, 2011 Leave a comment

We had an exciting symposium at Fuller Seminary two weeks ago. Presentations and other information will be made available soon. To view some photos, go to this link: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=278672&id=18289178852&l=1f262fba1e

We are posting some initial reflections from Kevin Park and David Choi. Kevin Park is Associate for Theology in the Office of Theology and Worship, General Assembly Council of Presbyterian Church USA in Louisville, KY. David Choi is Senior Pastor of Praise Presbyterian Church in New Jersey. He received his PhD in church history from Princeton Theological Seminary. We invite others to share their thoughts, too!

Kevin Park:

One of my denomination’s (Presbyterian Church (USA)) confessions of faith includes this sentence:

“the Spirit gives us courage…  to hear the voices of peoples long silenced…” (A Brief Statement of Faith, 70).

It takes courage to hear the silenced voices but it takes more courage for those voices to speak out. During the Asian American Equipping Symposium: Living Out the Gospel II—Asian American History—The Lost Coin, a symphony of courageous, creative, learned, and passionate voices was heard, not merely breaking the silence but catapulting Asian American history, ministry, biblical and theological scholarship to new levels. I was especially delighted to hear from Asian American women scholars, leaders and writers who wrote the book Mirrored Reflections: Reframing Biblical Characters. One of the ongoing challenges doing ministry in many Asian American contexts is that Asian American women are often still doubly marginalized in male dominated ministries of Asian American churches. The contributors of Mirrored Reflections have woven their stories with the stories of women in the Bible that results in fresh and often startling interpretations that inform and empower Asian American women and men. It was also gratifying to witness so many young 1.5 and 2nd generation Asian American scholars and pastors who are giving a resounding and robust voice to the often quiet if not silent Asian American experiences.  The AAES was a gratifying experience that helped vindicate that Asian American Christianity in North America is embodied in thriving communities of faith with polyphonic voices that is multi-ethnic, multi-generational, and ecumenical, all grounded in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

David Choi:

What remains with me is the pride I felt at seeing so many Asian American scholars engaged in this topic. While the research seems to be still in its infancy, it was great to hear from so many scholars doing good work and I look forward to their future contributions. I thought, overall, the speakers were relevant and helpful (some, of course, more so than others). I also like the plan of the symposium of having panels and then having responses to them. My one criticism would be that the responders to the panels were not sufficiently critical. They understandably lavished praise (often deserved), but they usually failed to raise the kinds of challenges that could have pushed them into deeper and more fruitful waters. Perhaps this is a reflection of the nature of Asian Americans to keep the peace?  I also benefited much from the table discussions. In the future, I would suggest slowing the pace a bit, especially toward the end. Our table was too tired after the last session and we stopped talking. And it’s too bad because I thought the last panel was the most interesting and I would have enjoyed a follow-up discussion. In any case, thank you again for organizing this and I hope to be able to attend the next one.

* * *

More reflections coming soon! – Tim Tseng

Asian North American Doctor of Missiology Cohort with Fuller Theological Seminary and ISAAC

February 9, 2011 3 comments

Are you a leader seeking to focus on dynamic issues or burning questions within your context so that you can bring about change? We invite you to join us in this exciting program!

The School of Intercultural Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary is pleased to announce that an Asian North American Missiology Cohort is gathering interest for a Fall 2011 launch with an on-campus intensive tentatively scheduled for November 28 -December 8, 2011.

As a group of missional practitioners, the ANA Missiology Cohort will collectively unpack unexamined assumptions that dictate ministry practices in such locales as the immigrant church, the Pan-Asian American church, parachurch ministries, and various mission organizations.

With this four-year program, key leaders will continue their ministries in-context, attending a cohort-based intensive once a year for four years. Each intensive consists of an eight-unit tutorial and a four-unit methodological course that will move research forward.

Students will study with a cohort of scholar-practitioners as faculty, including Dr. Mark Hopkins, Director of the Doctor of Missiology and Assistant Professor of Leadership at Fuller Seminary, Rev. Dr. Young Lee Hertig, Southern California Regional Director of ISAAC (Institute for the Study of Asian American Christianity)/AAWOL (Asian American Women on Leadership), and Rev. Dr. Timothy Tseng, Executive Director of ISAAC, who will serve as the primary cohort mentor. Further faculty will be scheduled to address the specific needs and goals of cohort participants.

Interested? Add your name to the ANA Missiology DMiss cohort “gathering interest” list by e-mailing dmiss@fuller.edu. All cohorts require a minimum number of interested applicants to be launched. The launch determination deadline for the cohort is April 29, 2011.

For further information please visit our website at www.fuller.edu/dmiss or contact Dave Stutzman at 626.584.5299.

Invite your colleagues and friends to join you in researching how you can strengthen your ministry!

National Update (Sept. 16, 2010)

September 17, 2010 Leave a comment

Sept. 16, 2010

Greetings friends!

I’m happy to share several new developments with ISAAC and SANACS since our last national newsletter. But first, you can save 10% off your purchase of our publications. Go to our revamped and simplified website: http://isaacweb.org, click “Publications,” select publication and click “Buy,” and enter code ‘ AUTUMN ‘ at checkout. The SANACS Journal 2010 is now available! [Click link]

Now for upcoming events and updates.

Read more…

SANACS Journal 2010 is now available!

August 14, 2010 Leave a comment

Two quick announcements!

• 10% discount sale for ISAAC publications! Go to “publications” at the ISAAC website. Click “Buy” and enter code ‘ FOUND ‘ at checkout You will save 10% off your purchase! [offer ends Aug. 31, 2010]

• The new issue of the SANACS Journal is now available! This issue contains the papers presented at ISAAC So Cal’s Asian American Equipping Symposium held at Fuller Theological Seminary (Pasadena, CA) on Nov. 2-3, 2009. Go to “publications” at the ISAAC website.

ISAAC Asian American Continuing Education Seminar

March 21, 2010 Leave a comment

“GOD IS ROOMY: GENERATIONS, GENDER, AND THE FUTURE OF ASIAN AMERICAN MINISTRY”

“And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the saints, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ and to know the love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.” — Ephesians 3:17

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2010, 9:00AM-5:00PM

FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Payton Hall, Room 303

Pasadena, CA

CO-SPONSORED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF ASIAN AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY of SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (ISAAC-SoCal) AND FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

As a follow up to the inaugural Asian American Equipping Symposium (AAES) held last November 2-3 at Fuller Theological Seminary, SoCal ISAAC is pleased to announce a one-day continuing education seminar for Asian American pastors, para-church leaders, and lay leaders.  Once again, Fuller President Richard J. Mouw will be with us to continue the dialogue we began last year and will address “The Future of Theological Formation.”  We will expand upon and unpack the content presented at the AAES, specifically the topographic analysis done by respondent Dr. Charlene Jin Lee  (Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Director of Student Formation, San Francisco Theological Seminary/Southern California) of one of the themes discussed by keynote speaker Dr. Jonathan Tran (Assistant Professor of Theological Ethics, Baylor University)–the “Roomy-ness of God”–to address gender, generations, and the future of Asian American ministry.  We look forward to seeing you all at this one-day event to experience God’s “vastness.”

THE PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

9:00am            Registration

9:30am            Introduction (Young Lee Hertig & Mary Hubbard Given)

10:00am          Future of Theological Formation (Richard J. Mouw)

10:30am          Q & A

10:45am          Roomy-ness of God and Gender in the Church (Charlene Jin Lee)

11:45am          Q & A

Noon               Lunch

1:00pm            Intergenerational Fish Bowl (Peter Lai, Kevin Doi)

2:00pm            Breakout sessions (generation, gender, and future)

3:30pm            Breakout session plenary and Reflection (Young Lee Hertig)

BREAKOUT SESSION QUESTIONS

The Roomy-ness of God and Gender in the Church:

  • Who is at your table?
  • Are we willing to image God and to speak and teach of God as beyond male?
  • Are we willing to image the ministry of God and theological agency entrusted to all made in God’s image?
  • Are we prepared to critically examine the male-bodiedness of our pastoral staff, of our sessions or governing boards, our elders, our leaders?
  • Are we prepared to widen the circle of our Theology and open the invisible gates in our churches to invite unintended, complex voices that might disturb and make messy whatever neat categories we’ve knowingly or unknowingly established?

The Roomy-ness of God and Intergenerational Relationships in the Church:

  • What pastoral traits does the pioneer generation want to impart to the succeeding generations?  (Peter Lai)
  • What are the most important issues that you want the pioneer generation to understand about your pastoral ministry? (Kevin Doi)

The Roomy-ness of God and Constructing Asian North American Theologies: The Power of Context, the Power of Story, “Historical Locatedness”

  • What are the priorities for God’s mission in today’s world?
  • Who are at the table of theological discourse?
  • Who are missing at the table?
  • What are the unifying stories?
  • Is there Asian American Christianity apart from European Christianity?

ADMINISTRATORS

* Young Lee Hertig: Director of SoCal ISAAC (Institute for the Study of Asian American Christianity) and AAWOL (Asian American Women On Leadership)

* Mary Hubbard Given: Associate Vice President of Alumni/ae and Church Relations, Fuller Theological Seminary

PRESENTERS

* Richard J. Mouw: President of Fuller Theological Seminary

* Charlene Jin Lee: Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Director of Spiritual Formation, San Francisco Theological Seminary/Southern California

* Peter Lai, Pastor of Alhambra True Light Presbyterian Church, Alhambra, California

* Kevin Doi, Pastor of Epic Church (American Baptist), Fullerton, California

REGISTRATION

Regular registration fee: $50.00

Student registration fee: $20.00

(Note to M.Div. students:  This seminar can qualify for field education units.  Please contact your seminary’s field education office to apply.)

Register online:  http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e2swg0rb4ffd593b